Historic Sites


Amazon Army March
Franklin Community Center
& Heritage Museum

(formerly Vignatelli's Hall)
Franklin Community Park
& Memorial Gardens

(formerly Franklin Community Center
Franklin Sidewalk
Franklin Welcome Sign
(formerly Saia's Garage)
Frontier Military Scenic ByWay
Jefferson Highway
Miners Hall Museum
Pauper's Cemetery

Amazon Army March
Area women participated in a mass march in December 1921 in which two to six thousand wives, daughters, mothers, sisters,
and sweethearts of striking miners marched in protest against unfair labor practices and laws across the coalfields of Southeast Kansas.
They considered their cause one of conserving democratic values rather than one of revolt.

The march made headlines across the state and the nation.
This large-scale involvement of women, christened the "Amazon Army" by the New York Times,
set this demonstration apart from the labor unrest that often disturbed the area.
www.amazonarmy.com
Site © Linda O'Nelio Knoll  

The march began at the Union Hall in Franklin, Kansas which is now the site of the
Franklin Community Center & Heritage Museum.  
Follow this link to read more about the Amazon Army and the placement of the historic marker.

Franklin Community Center & Heritage Museum
The center & museum was built shortly after the devastating tornado of 2003 w
hich destroyed much of the community including the former Franklin Community Hall.

Franklin Community Park & Memorial Gardens
The park is built at the site of the former Franklin Community Center. 
A memorial garden surrounded by pavers encircles the gardens. 
Many historic artifacts are incorporated into the design of the park.
The Franklin Community Park & Memorial Garden
runs adjacent to the Franklin Sidewalk which is listed on
the National and State Historic register.

Franklin Sidewalk
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places  by the United States Department of the Interior
March 16, 2007 and on the Kansas Register of Historic Places November 18, 2006
Constructed in 1936 with federal funding assistance, the Franklin Sidewalk connects two rural mining
communities in Crawford County - Arma and Franklin. The 3-foot wide sidewalk begins at the south
edge of Arma and stretches south 1.7 miles to the south edge of Franklin.  
It has become well known as the "longest sidewalk connecting two communities". 
It runs adjacent to Business 69 Highway also known as "Jefferson Highway" and the "Frontier Military Scenic Byway".

Franklin Welcome Sign

Frontier Military Scenic ByWay
The Byway was designated a state byway by the Kansas Legislature on June 15, 1990. It extends roughly 167 miles tying Fort Leavenworth to the north and then onward to the Oklahoma border.  The route approximates the old military trail used by the Army to transport troops and supplies between the frontier forts. 
Scenic ByWay Website

Jefferson Highway
The Jefferson Highway was the first transcontinental road to traverse the North American continent North to South and possibly the First Dedicated International Highway in the world.  Conceived at a meeting in New Orleans in 1915 the highway was dedicated in 1919.  Its Northern end was in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada then running through Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma,Arkansas, Texas and finally ending in New Orleans, Louisiana.   The Jefferson Highway only existed as a named highway for a few years until it lost its title to the new standardized numbering system in the 1920s. 
Jefferson Highway Website

HIGHWAY PAVING PROJECT

This marker is located at the south end of Arma.  It is one concrete pillar with a different plaque on each side.   These markers designate two highway projects.  
The photo on the right isn't too easily read but it says Project No. 120 and is dated 1923.

Project #40, 1922, was for paving a 16' wide concrete highway from the south end of Franklin
 to the south city limits of Arma.  

Project #120, 1923, was for paving a 16' wide concrete highway from the south send of Arma
to the north end of Arma. 

An item mentioned in the plans was that the county must pay for the marker out of their own funds
as it was not an eligible part of the project.


Pauper's Cemetery
More information to follow

Franklin Home Page
E-mail       franklinkansas@yahoo.com